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Japan can serve as a model for Kazakhstan

To think that an imperial province could be transformed into a new state and established as such in a durable manner just because the empire itself collapsed is a fallacy. This is evidenced by the recent history of Africa.

To think that an imperial province could be transformed into a new state and established as such in a durable manner just because the empire itself collapsed is a fallacy. This is evidenced by the recent history of Africa.

At the time, the Soviet people, while seeing a poster showing a black man who had been breaking the chains of colonialism, thought that poverty and backwardness now would be successfully combated in the former African colonies of the Western powers, and those newly independent States would succeed in finding and securing its place on the political map of the world and move forward on the path of promoting the so-called welfare societies…
Reality has shown to be different. By the 1990’s, Africa recovered that same level of development until the early 1960s when it was still under the colonial rule of France, Britain, Belgium and Portugal. The question is: what was the point of getting away from colonialism?!
During the 1980s, Zimbabwe that had been under the authority of white Europeans until the late 1970s appeared to be the most attractive country in Africa regarding both development level and way in which public life and state management were organized. Starting in the 1990s, this leading role has kind of shifted to the South African Republic.
And here’s the thing: the later an African country gets rid of the European colonial oppressor the better is its overall developmental situation. There is something paradoxical in such cases.
Yet it just indicates that States in a proper sense do not emerge where there is no mature foundation for this. That is corroborated by an abundance of evidence. Being a State is not so much the fact of finding yourself recognized as an independent state by neighboring countries, but the fact there is the idea of statehood that has won your people’s hearts and minds. If it has really taken hold in your society and among your population, a new nation-State would be born and manage to stand on its own two feet, even though nothing else suggests the possibility of its emergence. The idea of statehood that has matured and been established in people’s hearts and minds is a powerful, through grinding force.
Only a society, which is quite self containing and capable to adequately meet the challenges of the times, can lead the charge for statehood. Or this is a society in desperate search for ways of achieving such capacity. That sense of purpose, accompanied by general, widespread willingness to selflessly make extraordinary efforts while pursuing national objectives, was at the core of Japan’s emergence as a modern State and world power.
Just one and a half century ago, when commodore Matthew Perry of the United States Navy, commanding a squadron of two steamers and two sailing vessels, forced the Japanese to open their ports to the outside world after about 250 years of self-imposed isolation, that had been a typical backward Eastern monarchy.
By that time, there were practically no inhabited areas on the earth that would not have been directly affected by actions of Europeans. The commitment to progress in emulating European achievements had already long been imperative for the rest of humanity. The Japanese have entered this race being almost last in line.
Then even the Kazakhs were one step ahead of them, as there were small numbers of people from the Kazakhstani steppes who had already been studying in Russian educational institutions and gaining the European knowledge and skills by the time of the opening of Japan.
Yet the Land of the Rising Sun overtook all the rest of humanity in over a hundred years. And now Japan is almost the most modern country in the world.
And what’s surprising is that the Japanese have much in common with Kazakhs. That includes the physical and mental similarities between them and many commonalities between their languages. And it is not only words. In an interview with the Kazakhstan National TV channel, Tsunokake Mariko, the third secretary of the Japanese embassy in Astana, told it had taken her 10 months to learn the Kazakh language, and she noted that Kazakh was similar to Japanese. There is no doubt about this. Word order (sentence structure) in Japanese practically the same as that in Kazakh. The socio-linguists assume that languages are never neutral, but are a reflection of given lifestyles, cultures, practices and behavior. If understood in this sense, it turns out that consanguinity and historic ties between these two nations are reflected in their cultures and civilizations. Japan therefore can serve as a model for Kazakhstan.

Danish AZIM


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